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Tips For Veterans Entering the Civilian Job Market

by Tracey A. Maine on December 30, 2019

According to a recent article on LinkedIn, many of the skills veterans acquire in the military aren’t necessarily preparing them to enter the civilian job market.

In the article, George Anders details how credentials like having a security clearance, an infantry background and job titles like “encryption specialist” aren’t exactly the kind of skills most employers are looking for in job candidates.

In addition, the article points out some other aspects that are hindering many veterans’ ability to make the transition from soldier to civilian employee:

  • Not knowing how to dress properly for job interviews
  • Not having a professional-looking resume
  • Not knowing how to utilize job search tools like LinkedIn
  • Not being able to adapt to civilian work habits
  • Not being prepared to handle drastic pay cuts

However, Anders piece points out the following reasons why veterans make excellent job candidates:

  • Good work ethic
  • Work well under pressure
  • Time management skills
  • Excel at teamwork
  • Leadership qualities

How can a veteran improve their chances of getting a good job?

In each case, all the veterans Anders profiled were able to secure good-paying jobs courtesy of their decision to return to school. The author also states that “college-educated veterans are 39% more likely to be promoted to a leadership role than their civilian peers.” 

For example, one veteran Anders interviewed who went back to school went from being a bouncer at a bar to becoming an infrastructure engineer at a software company.

What does Hocking College have to offer veterans who decide to go back to school?

Located in Nelsonville, Ohio Hocking College is a public community college that offers more than 60 Associate and Vocational programs and is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. 

Hocking College’s Veterans & Service Members Resource Center is committed to providing high-quality academic and student support services to Veterans, Active-Duty Service members, Reservists, National Guard members, and Military Families.

For more information on HC’s Veterans & Service Members Resource Center contact Director Stephen Powell by phone at 740-753-7055 or by email at powells25816@hocking.edu

other services that Hocking College has that could benefit veterans

Hocking College’s Career & University Center provides the following services to foster professionalism in students:

  • Resume review services to assist students in developing and polishing their job resumes   
  • Instruction in how to utilize job search tools
  • Interview strategy services to teach students how to properly conduct themselves during job interviews
  • Workshops designed to assist students in developing their career skills
  • Etiquette dinners held at Rhapsody Restaurant in Nelsonville, Ohio for the purpose of teaching students how to conduct themselves during business lunches and dinners
  • Conduct job fairs to introduce future graduates to potential employers
  • Provide business-oriented clothing to students who are going on job interviews

For more information on Hocking College’s Career and University Center contact Director Danita Reynolds by email at glennd22689@hocking.edu or by phone at (740) 753-6445.

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