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The Hocking College Experience

Students in GeoEnvironmental Science Program Study Ohio’s Buried Valley Aquifers

by Hocking College Contributing Writer

Groundwater supplies about 40% of the nation’s drinking water. It's especially important in rural areas, but even urban areas may depend on groundwater to meet a significant portion of daily needs. Groundwater, unlike surface water in streams and lakes, is a largely invisible resource because its presence is hidden beneath the Earth's surface. Groundwater is not evenly distributed and is available in greater quantities in some areas than in others.

GeoEnvironmental Students Study the Connection Between Streams, Groundwater & City Water Wells

by Hocking College Contributing Writer

One primary goal of the GeoEnvironmental Science Program is to train students in skills and concepts important to protection and assessment of groundwater resources, as well as monitoring and remediation of polluted ground water. An important part of the conceptual foundation which guides hands-on efforts to conserve and restore threatened groundwater supplies is the physical connection between groundwater and surface water, such as streams, lakes, and wetlands.

GeoEnvironmental Science Students Examine Field-Evidence of the Last Ohio Sea

by Hocking College Contributing Writer

Students from the GeoEnvironmental Science Program ascend a local highway road to cut in search of Ames limestone. This distinctive rock layer marks the last time seas flooded Ohio. This is a significant event in Ohio's geologic history and is one that's observed in the Historical Geology course at Hocking, which focuses on the geologic origin of the North American continent in particular.

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